Events

  • Wed
    18
    Oct
    2017
    7-8:30 p.m.

    Do terms like "systemic racism" or "white privilege" puzzle you? Join a book discussion to investigate the historical context of suppression of people of color in this country and the struggle to understand racism and racial tensions. Irving’s book provides a starting place to begin coming to terms with the roles white people play, often inadvertently and unintentionally, in perpetuating the status quo of race relations in 21st century USA.

    Here’s an opportunity to examine some common questions and assumptions that get in the way of honest conversations about race:

    • My family hasn’t benefited by slavery - my grandparents didn’t even come to this country until after the Civil War. We had nothing to do with slavery.
    • I got where I am by sacrifice and hard work. Anybody who wants to can do the same in this country.
    • I don’t have a yacht. I’m not privileged.
    • Don’t all lives matter?

    Waking Up White

    Waking Up White by Debby Irving

    “Irving’s personal and moving tale takes us on an adventure to a world utterly new to her as she wakes up to the reality of how, without her knowledge or active pursuit, she lives in a society which is set up to reward her at the expense of people of color. I cannot imagine a more understandable and compelling invitation to learn about how racism lives on in our homes, communities, and nation.” Bishop Gene Robinson, Retired Episcopal Bishop of New Hampshire and Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress, Washington, DC.

    This discussion is one of three planned and sponsored by Community Concerned for Justice of the Peterborough Unitarian Church and Monadnock Quaker Meeting. Discussion dates are Oct. 18th, Oct. 25th, and Nov. 1st. Admission is free.

  • Mon
    23
    Oct
    2017
    7:00 pm

    Two years after we all saw overwhelming images of refugees crossing the Aegean to Greece, many refugees still live in limbo. The film and media project, Stuck In The Doorway, is an ongoing examination of the lives of the 60,000 people currently in Greece, some making a new life there, others still trying to get to a new home. This film and discussion builds on Michel Bolsey's experiences as one of three filmmakers attempting to delve beneath the headlines to better unerstand the complex and multi-faceted stories of people involved in this phenomenon. For more on this project, visit stuckinthedoorway.com.

    Michel Bolsey has a long history of involvement in the Middle East and Greece. He was a schoolteacher in a Lebanese village during the 70s and continued as a journalist operating out of Lebanon for National Geographic, Smithsonian, Aramco Magazine and other media. He founded and hosted the award-winning Pacifica Radio program, "Middle East in Focus," devoted to news, politics, and culture from that region. MEIF was one of the first news programs in the U.S. to bring Palestinians and Israelis together around a microphone. Michel continued to host MEIF for ten years, and 37 years later the program still airs on the Pacifica network. He has been a regular visitor to Greece, Lebanon, Turkey, Syria, Israel, Palestine and Egypt. He is bilingual in French and English, fluent in Levantine Arabic and speaks conversational Greek.

    Admission: Free!

  • Wed
    25
    Oct
    2017
    7-8:30 p.m.

    Do terms like "systemic racism" or "white privilege" puzzle you? Join a book discussion to investigate the historical context of suppression of people of color in this country and the struggle to understand racism and racial tensions. Irving’s book provides a starting place to begin coming to terms with the roles white people play, often inadvertently and unintentionally, in perpetuating the status quo of race relations in 21st century USA.

    Here’s an opportunity to examine some common questions and assumptions that get in the way of honest conversations about race:

    • My family hasn’t benefited by slavery - my grandparents didn’t even come to this country until after the Civil War. We had nothing to do with slavery.
    • I got where I am by sacrifice and hard work. Anybody who wants to can do the same in this country.
    • I don’t have a yacht. I’m not privileged.
    • Don’t all lives matter?

    Waking Up White

    Waking Up White by Debby Irving

    “Irving’s personal and moving tale takes us on an adventure to a world utterly new to her as she wakes up to the reality of how, without her knowledge or active pursuit, she lives in a society which is set up to reward her at the expense of people of color. I cannot imagine a more understandable and compelling invitation to learn about how racism lives on in our homes, communities, and nation.” Bishop Gene Robinson, Retired Episcopal Bishop of New Hampshire and Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress, Washington, DC.

    This discussion is one of three planned and sponsored by Community Concerned for Justice of the Peterborough Unitarian Church and Monadnock Quaker Meeting. Discussion dates are Oct. 18th, Oct. 25th, and Nov. 1st. Admission is free.

  • Wed
    01
    Nov
    2017
    7-8:30 p.m.

    Do terms like "systemic racism" or "white privilege" puzzle you? Join a book discussion to investigate the historical context of suppression of people of color in this country and the struggle to understand racism and racial tensions. Irving’s book provides a starting place to begin coming to terms with the roles white people play, often inadvertently and unintentionally, in perpetuating the status quo of race relations in 21st century USA.

    Here’s an opportunity to examine some common questions and assumptions that get in the way of honest conversations about race:

    • My family hasn’t benefited by slavery - my grandparents didn’t even come to this country until after the Civil War. We had nothing to do with slavery.
    • I got where I am by sacrifice and hard work. Anybody who wants to can do the same in this country.
    • I don’t have a yacht. I’m not privileged.
    • Don’t all lives matter?

    Waking Up White

    Waking Up White by Debby Irving

    “Irving’s personal and moving tale takes us on an adventure to a world utterly new to her as she wakes up to the reality of how, without her knowledge or active pursuit, she lives in a society which is set up to reward her at the expense of people of color. I cannot imagine a more understandable and compelling invitation to learn about how racism lives on in our homes, communities, and nation.” Bishop Gene Robinson, Retired Episcopal Bishop of New Hampshire and Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress, Washington, DC.

    This discussion is one of three planned and sponsored by Community Concerned for Justice of the Peterborough Unitarian Church and Monadnock Quaker Meeting. Discussion dates are Oct. 18th, Oct. 25th, and Nov. 1st. Admission is free.

  • Wed
    15
    Nov
    2017
    7:00 pm

    What parts of our history do we choose to remember? How do we choose to remember? And what history do we forget, or try to forget?

    Our country is debating whether or not to remove Confederate statues. Princeton University could rename the Woodrow Wilson Center. Some cities no longer recognize Columbus Day. Plaques on buildings recognize the slaves who lived and worked there. Germany places brass-capped cobblestones, or “stumble stones”, in front of the homes that once belonged to Jewish families taken away in the Holocaust.

    At our fall Circle, we invite participants to reflect on our lives and the history, from our own life span or that of our ancestors, that we choose to remember and the history we prefer to forget.

    Admission: Free


    Leaf Seligman

    Leaf Seligman

    Leaf Seligman is an adjunct Professor at Keene State College and President of the Monadnock Restorative Community whose mission is to support women reintegrating into the community after incarceration. Leaf is the founder of Restorative Circles Services.

    In today’s world of increasing conflict, Leaf Seligman’s work in bringing together a community for respectful dialogue and understanding is ever more important.

  • Fri
    19
    Jan
    2018
    7:00 pm

    This concert double-header features two unique interpreters of the music of the lands once ruled by the Ottomans. The Brooklyn, NY based trio Dolunay (Turkish for “full moon”) draws upon the songs from the Turkish people living across Rumeli, the former region of the Ottoman Balkans. Dolunay’s intimate sound, sparse in loudness and textured with the dissonance of eastern blues, gives way to a sound at once earthy and celestial, the size of which defies that of the small makeup of the band. The ensemble is Jenny Luna (voice, percussion), Adam Good (ud, tambura) and Eylem Basaldi (violin). www.dolunay.com

    cesni trio

    Çeşni Trio

    The music of Boston based Çeşni Trio is grounded in the flavors (çeşniler) of Turkish makam music while remaining personal and contemporary. The ensemble guides listeners from dove-tailing contemplative melodies to odd-metered tunes that throw caution to the wind. Çeşni Trio is Tev Stevig (tanbur, ud, fretless 7-string guitar, alternatelli), Michael K. Harrist (yayli tanbur, ney, double bass) and Fabio Pirozzolo (darbuka, bendir, cajon, tombak, riq). https://www.tevstevig.com/cesni-trio