EXHIBIT: Democracy in Action: Celebrating the Women of the 116th Congress

EXHIBIT: Democracy in Action: Celebrating the Women of the 116th Congress

With Artist Talk on Wednesday, November 6 at 6:30pm – click here for details

The ancient Japanese stencil-dyeing art of katazome meets present day politics in this extraordinary exhibit by textile artist Cheryl Lawrence. All 131 women serving in the 116th U.S. Congress — the largest representation of women in any U.S. Congress — are honored with portraits created on prayer flags crafted by Lawrence and 19 other women from her community on Whidbey Island, Washington.

The artist writes: “My recently completed textile project is both an homage and a call to arms that celebrates the historic number of 131 brave and powerful women currently serving in the 116th Congress. These women, whatever their political views and personal values, have the courage to be seen, the courage to be heard, the courage to try to make a difference.”

EXHIBIT: Democracy in Action: Celebrating the Women of the 116th Congress

The art is a collection of portraits designed as prayer flags that celebrate and honor each congresswoman, their values, and the multitude of issues they are contending with.

Each portrait is based on the official congressional photograph of the congresswoman. The photographs were used to produce stencils which were then transfixed to silk organza fabric, layered with other hand-dyed fabrics, and stitched and embellished with multi-color threads, buttons, and beads.

Learn more about the project and meet the artist on Wednesday, November 6th at 6:30pm as we begin the countdown to the 2020 elections.

 


About the Artist

Cheryl Lawrence is a native of Seattle who now lives on Whidbey Island. She is a textile artist specializing in both natural dyeing and katazome, a Japanese style of stencil dyeing. Cheryl will speak about her latest project, Democracy In Action, which combines her political, personal and artistic interests. Her talk will focus on the genesis of the project, the puzzle pieces that came together in its creation and specifics of the art of katazome. Democracy In Action features portrait stencils of the 131 women currently serving in the 116th Congress – an unprecedented number of women. Cheryl believes that art, in every form, can begin conversations and open our hearts and minds as well as make meaningful connections between people. She is pleased to be exhibited at the Mariposa Museum & World Culture Center and hopes the exhibit sparks interesting reflections.

EXHIBIT: Democracy in Action: Celebrating the Women of the 116th Congress


This exhibit is generously sponsored by the New Hampshire Women’s Foundation, Jack Daniels Motor Inn, and Martha and Frank Manley. Thank you for your support!

EXHIBIT: Democracy in Action: Celebrating the Women of the 116th Congress EXHIBIT: Democracy in Action: Celebrating the Women of the 116th Congress

 

 

 

 

 


 

Sindiso Mnisi Weeks: Access to Justice and Human Security: Cultural Contradictions in Rural South Africa

Access to Justice and Human Security: Cultural Contradictions in Rural South Africa

For rural South Africans, the most feasible access to justice lies in traditional mechanisms. These mechanisms are associated with restorative justice, reconciliation, and harmony. Yet historical conditions and contemporary pressures have strained these mechanisms’ ability to deliver these high ideals. Sharing research from her new book, NH resident and UMass/Boston Assistant Professor Sindiso Mnisi Weeks explores how human insecurity, low cooperation between traditional and state authorities, and profoundly gendered social relations and distrust create an environment in which violence is a predictable strategy for managing disputes. Prof. Mnisi Weeks also proposes a cooperative governance model that would increase the capacity of traditional an state mechanisms to deliver legal and social justice — and the peace and relief from violence, poverty, and destitution that rural people truly need.

Sindiso Mnisi Weeks: Access to Justice and Human Security: Cultural Contradictions in Rural South AfricaSindiso Mnisi Weeks is an Assistant Professor at UMass/Boston and the author of the book, Access to Justice and Human Security: Cultural Contradictions in Rural South Africa. She has published in academic and popular media on customary law, women’s rights, cultural rights, governance. Her current work focuses on the pursuit of justice and human security in indigenous courts by poor women and men living in rural South Africa. She has served as a senior researcher in the Centre for Law and Society at the University of Cape Town. There, she worked on the Rural Women’s Action-Research program, which combines research, advocacy, and policy work on women, property, and governing authority under customary law. In 2013-14 she was a resident scholar at the University of New Hampshire School of Law, where she held a fellowship for the completion of a book.

Admission: $10, Mariposa members are free!